butterfly relaxation technique

the butterfly hug is an easy relaxation technique that can be used anywhere, at any time. as many people know, the brain is divided into two hemispheres, the left brain and right brain. the right brain dominates areas of logic, patterns and control. the butterfly hug is a type of bilateral stimulation because it crosses the mid line of the body. research has found that when your extremities cross the center line of the body, it activates that other side of the body. this involves having an unexpected negative reaction to some type of familiar stimuli that brings back an emotion, agitation, memory or flashback of a past traumatic event. logically you may realize that you aren’t in danger, but your body is reacting automatically because of that traumatic event. one way to manage these triggers is to practice self-soothing skills to relax the body and calm the mind. we have signals that travel back and forth all the time. on the other hand, if we can relax our body, these signals travel up to the brain which leads to more relaxing thoughts and calmer emotions.

in 1998 emdr therapists lucina (lucy) artigas and ignacio jarero went traveled to acapulco, mexico to helps those struggling after hurricane pauline. lucy artigas created and modeled a technique that resembled butterfly wings fluttering. * cross your hands and place them on your chest so each middle finger rests right below the opposite collarbone. now, you are going to alternate tapping your hands on your chest, slowly and rhythmically (left, right, left, right, etc.) stop and check your level of distress. alternative method: another way that i have seen the butterfly hug used was simply by putting your right hand on your left upper arm and your left hand on your right upper arm and tapping your upper arms. whichever is more comfortable for you is fine. this is a self-soothing tool that can be used to reduce your distress. if you are interested in seeing a ptsd therapist or would like additional information on trauma treatment, call or contact me for a free consultation or to schedule an appointment. toolbox series 2: butterfly hug with debbie augenthaler. (n.d.) science shows how crossing your arms and legs can hugely change your brain.

when i was in training as a therapist, i came across an approach called ” emdr” (short for eye movement desensitization and reprocessing) which is a fairly new, non-traditional type of psychotherapy. whilst it is used a lot in dealing with ptsd, it can also be used in day to day situations to calm and ground ourselves and lower our stress levels and come back to the present moment.

they then move their hands like the wings of a butterfly, to tap their arms/shoulders in an alternating rhythm. the “butterfly hug”, or “hug of self love” originated with lucy artigas, while working in acapulco with survivors of hurricane paulina in 1997. sometimes this approach is taught in the context of therapy, but like other techniques such as anchoring in nlp it can be done by individuals as a self soothing approach when under stress.

the butterfly hug is an easy relaxation technique that can be used anywhere, at any time. it is a great self-soothing tool, which can be the butterfly hug is accomplished by an individual wrap their arms around themselves, so that each hand touches the opposite upper arm or shoulder. they then the butterfly hug is an immediate stress-reducing technique, and is something you can do right now to decrease anxiety and lower your heart, butterfly hug handout pdf, butterfly hug handout pdf, butterfly hug method psychology, butterfly hug panic attack, butterfly hug method benefits.

if you wish, you can interlock your thumbs to form the butterfly’s body and the extension of your other fingers outward will form the butterfly’s wings. the butterfly hug is a method of therapeutic intervention to help relax and calm a hyper-aroused self. the butterfly hug was developed by two practitioners, “it’s a bilateral stimulation technique [aka, alternating stimulation on both sides of the body] that helps us ground ourselves when we’re, the butterfly hug method, emdr butterfly hug, why does the butterfly hug work, butterfly hug anxiety, butterfly hug bilateral stimulation, butterfly hug for grief, butterfly hug it’s okay to not be okay, butterfly hug gif, butterfly hugs images, bilateral stimulation activities.

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